History

Section NE-3A was formed at the close of the 2011 Conclave held at Five Rivers Council Camp Gorton on August 21, 2011.  The section consists of 5 lodges covering western New York, central New York, southern tier New York, and northern Pennsylvania.

Conclaves

  • 2011: Camp Gorton in Five Rivers Council
  • 2012: Camp Babcock-Hovey in Seneca Waterways Council
  • 2013: Camp Sam Wood in Iroquois Trails Council
  • 2014: Camp Scouthaven in Greater Niagara Frontier Council
  • 2015: Camp Woodland in Longhouse Council
  • 2016: Camp Gorton in Five Rivers Council
  • 2017: Camp Babcock-Hovey in Seneca Waterways Council

2017-2018 Officers and Advisers

  • Section Chief Zach Hill from Lowanne Nimat Lodge of Longhouse Council
  • Section Vice Chief Nathaniel Bauder from Tschipey Achtu Lodge of Seneca Waterways Council
  • Section Secretary Peter Huber from Tschipey Achtu Lodge of Seneca Waterways Council
  • Section Adviser Rick Coloccia from Tschipey Achtu Lodge of Seneca Waterways Council
  • Section Associate Adviser Jim Nelson from Lowanne Nimat Lodge of Longhouse Council
  • Section Associate Adviser Jamie Prowse from Ho-De-No-Sau-Nee Lodge of Greater Niagara Frontier Council

2016-2017 Officers and Advisers

  • Section Chief Forrest Gertin (2016) from Tschipey Achtu Lodge of Seneca Waterways Council.
  • Section Chief Zach Hill (2017) from Lowanne Nimat Lodge of Longhouse Council
  • Section Vice Chief Zach Hill (2016) from Lowanne Nimat Lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Vice Chief Peter Huber (2017) from Tschipey Acthu Lodge of Seneca Waterways Council
  • Section Secretary Peter Huber (2016) from Tschipey Achtu Lodge of Seneca Waterways Council.
  • Section Secretary Bryan Hitchings (2017) from Tschipey Acthu Lodge of Seneca Waterways Council
  • Section Adviser Rick Coloccia from Tschipey Achtu Lodge of Seneca Waterways Council.
  • Section Associate Adviser Jim Nelson from Lowanne Nimat Lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Associate Adviser Jamie Prowse from Ho-De-No-Sau-Nee of Greater Niagara Frontier Council

2015-2016 Officers and Advisers

  • Section Chief Forrest Gertin from Tschipey Achtu Lodge of Seneca Waterways Council.
  • Section Vice Chief Tyler Davis from Ashokwahta Lodge of Iroquois Trails Council.
  • Section Secretary Thomas Hall from Lowanne Nimat lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Adviser Rick Coloccia from Tschipey Achtu Lodge of Seneca Waterways Council.
  • Section Associate Adviser Jim Nelson from Lowanne Nimat lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Associate Adviser Jamie Prowse from Ho-De-No-Sau-Nee Lodge of Greater Niagara Frontier Council.

2014-2015 Officers and Advisers

  • Section Chief Domonic Mathews from TKaen DoD lodge of Five Rivers Council.
  • Section Vice Chief Forrest Gertin from Tschipey Achtu Lodge of Seneca Waterways Council.
  • Section Secretary CJ Long from Ho-De-No-Sau-Nee lodge of Greater Niagara Frontier Council.
  • Section Adviser Wayne Farnsworth from Lowanne Nimat lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Associate Adviser Jim Nelson from Lowanne Nimat lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Associate Adviser Rick Coloccia from Tschipey Achtu Lodge of Seneca Waterways Council.

2013-2014 Officers and Advisers

  • Section Chief Kyle Piper (2013) from Tschipey Achtu Lodge of Seneca Waterways Council.
  • Section Chief (2014) Alex Kieffer from Ashokwahta Lodge of Iroquois Trails Council.
  • Section Vice Chief Forrest Gertin from Tschipey Achtu Lodge of Seneca Waterways  Council.
  • Section Secretary Gaven DeWert from TKaen DoD lodge of Five Rivers Council.
  • Section Adviser Wayne Farnsworth from Lowanne Nimat lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Associate Adviser Jim Nelson from Lowanne Nimat lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Associate Adviser Brian Love from TKaen DoD lodge of Five Rivers Council.

2012-2013 Officers and Advisers

  • Section Chief Willis Farnsworth from Lowanne Nimat lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Vice Chief Tim Jordan from Lowanne Nimat lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Secretary Forrest Gertin from Tschipey Achtu lodge of Seneca Waterways Council.
  • Section Adviser Wayne Farnsworth from Lowanne Nimat lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Associate Adviser Jim Nelson from Lowanne Nimat lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Associate Adviser Brian Love from TKaen DoD lodge of Five Rivers Council.

2011-2012 Officers and Advisers

  • Section Chief Jim Prowse from Ho-De-No-Sau-Nee lodge of Greater Niagara Frontier Council.
  • Section Vice Chief Billy Ernest from TKaen DoD lodge of Five Rivers Council.
  • Kyle Smith from Ashokwahta lodge of Iroquois Trails Council.
  • Section Adviser Wayne Farnsworth from Lowanne Nimat lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Associate Adviser Jim Nelson from Lowanne Nimat lodge of Longhouse Council.
  • Section Associate Adviser Brian Love from TKaen DoD lodge of Five Rivers Council.

TKaen DoD Lodge History

In the spring of 1992 two lodges started to meet to begin merger talks. TKaen DoD 186 of Five Rivers Council and Winingus 30 of General Sullivan Council began to form a new lodge. TKaen DoD who had just been through a merger between Wakanda Lodge 186 and Seneca Lodge 394 just 15 months before this. Winingus Lodge 30 was celebrating their 65th Anniversary at the time. Marc McGrain was the Lodge Chief of TKaen DoD 186 and Jason Root was the Lodge Chief of Winingus 30. The Lodge decided to take the name of Take DoD and the number of 30 from Winin- gus to form TKaen DoD Lodge 30. After a few months they had come up with by-laws and were on their way as a new lodge.

Since that time, the new TKaen DoD 30 has achieved Quality Lodge several times, as well as having several section officers and most recently Jon Fuller serve as Region Chief.

Lowanne Nimat Lodge History

Lowanne Nimat Lodge was formed from the merger of Kayanernh Kowa and Tahgajute Lodges on January 1, 2010. Youth members of the two lodges had already established strong bonds of brotherhood during their shared experiences traveling as a combined NOAC contingent in both 2006 and in 2009, and the name Lowanne Nimat- translated as Brothers of the North- reflects this. The new lodge’s totem, the red fox, is symbolic of cunning charm, and is closely allied with warriors and generals. Characteristics attributed to this totem include grace, agility, cleverness, patience, quick- wittedness, and stealth.

The new lodge went on to achieve Quality Lodge status during its first year of existence, 2010.  Members of the lodge strongly support national programs, including 10 brothers participating at Summit Corps, 4 participating at Indian Summer, and one serving on OA Trail Crew at Philmont this summer. Arrowmen staffed a provisional unit at camp this past summer, and have renewed their focus on service in support of council camping programs and the Order’s camp chief program.

Ho-De-No-Sau-Nee Lodge History

Ganosote Lodge was formed in Erie County Council in 1921 by Hans Walter, the chairman of the Camping Committee. The name “Ganosote” means “longhouse,” the living building of the Iroquois. In 1949, the Erie County Council merged with the Buffalo Council to form the Buffalo Area Council. The Buffalo had an organization similar to the Order of the Arrow called the “Tribe of the Wa-canda.” This organization was dissolved and the new council adopted the Order of the Arrow and continued the name and totem of Ganosote. In 1960, the Lodge broke up into twelve chapters allowing more members to take an active part in the Order of the Arrow. Chapters were Amherst, Apache, Cattaraugus, Cayuga, Cazenovia, Ellicott, Erie, Iroquois, Kenton, Mohawk, Red Jacket, and Tonawandas. The lodge was in existence until the 1967 merger with Tuscarora Lodge 284.

In 1945, Tuscarora Lodge came into being. The five original members came from all over the U.S. One even came from the Philadelphia Council where the OA was introduced to Scouting. In August of 1945, the first Ordeal ceremony was held on the Tuscarora Indian Reservation. The name Tuscarora was taken as the Lodge name. The name means the “Shirt Wearers.” Eventaully two chapters were formed – Ongara and Portage. The lodge was in existence until the 1967 merger with Ganosote Lodge 159.

In early spring 1967, the Greater Niagara Frontier Council was formed with a merger of the Niagara Frontier Council (Tuscarora Lodge) and the Buffalo Area Council (Ganosote Lodge). A new merged Lodge was formed, taking the name Ho-De-No-Sau-Nee, meaning “People of the Longhouse.”

Merger Details: 1/24/67 Consolidation Meeting; 2/13/67 Name Approved; 2/14/67 Camping Committee Approval; 2/67 Executive Board Approval.

An interim lodge chief (Paul Murray) was chosen to lead the lodge until elections were held at the spring lodge conclave. Mark Warner was elected and became the first official Ho-De-No-Sau-Nee lodge chief. Initially, the lodge had fourteen chapters (twelve from Ganosote and two from Tuscarora). However, a year after the merger the number of chapters was reduced to twelve. In 1970, the Niagara Falls chapters merged. In 1983, 1986, and 1990 there were a series of chapter mergers. Finally, from 1990 until 2002 there were only three chapters. Things changed in 2002 when the lodge added a chapter (Theodore Roosevelt). In 2004 the Council split three of the four districts in half. The chapters retained the same boundaries with Onondaga Chapter containing Cayuga & Iroquois Trail Districts. Polaris Chapter was made up of Niagara Gateway & Niawanda Districts. Silver Lakes Chapter was made up of Erie Shores & Southern Hills Districts. Theodore Roosevelt Chapter was the Theodore Roosevelt District.

In 2007 the Theodore Roosevelt Chapter merged with the Onondaga Chapter. Silver Lakes Chapter changed it’s name to Seneca Chapter. Polaris Chapter changed it’s name to Falling Waters.

Ashokwahta Lodge History

Our lodge started in 1994 from the merger of two lodges Amo’chk and Tuighaunock. So we will begin with the start of these two.

In June of 1946 Genesee lodge was formed when Charles Ball, Camp Sam Wood director and Leroy Brown, Area 2 Director and Genesee Council Executive invited 4 members of Ganesote Lodge and Camp Ti- Wa Ya-Eee staff to hold the first Order of the Arrow elections. That summer 22 members were inducted.

In 1947 the Lodge changed it’s name to Ta-Na-Wis-Qua after the 4 districts in the Council, Tonawanda, Wiscoy, Nundawaga, and Keshaqua. At a meeting held at Letchworth State Park in 1950 the Lodge name was changed to Amo’chk’, the Ojibwa word for beaver. They adopted the beaver as their totem. The first Lodge patch was a half moon shape and featured a beaver on it.

In 1949 Tuighaunock Lodge was formed in Allegany State Park at Camp Lewiston Trail where the council had its first Scout Camp. Tuighaunock came from the Algonquin word meaning, much water and many woods. The first pocket flap showed an Indian Maiden passing over Niagara Falls in a canoe, signifying sacrifice.

In 1994 with the merger of the councils, a new Lodge was formed. They took the name of Ashokwahta, the Iroquois word for peace. The first flap had a peace pipe (the lodge totem) on it, with a bow as the border of the flap. We are a small lodge of just over 300. Chapters were dissolved in 1998.

We have been very actively supporting our council camps, having donated $3000 or more each year to camp improvements. We also donate an average of 5000 man hours to camp maintenance and improvements each year.

Tschipey Achtu Lodge History

Seneca Waterways Council’s Tschipey Achtu Lodge formed in early 2010 from the merger of Otetiana Council’s Ty-Ohni Lodge (1936 – 2010) and Finger Lakes Council’s Ganeodiyo Lodge (1947 – 2010). The merger of the two councils had occurred the previous year, but the lodges waited until the final Ty-Ohni Lodge Banquet on January 31 to formalize their merger. According to the Lenape / English Dictionary (gilwell.com) the name “Tschipey” means spirit, ghost or dead body, and “Achtu” means deer. Another source specifies that “Achtu” refers specifically to a female deer. The theme of the Ghost Deer has strong roots in Seneca tradition, local zoology, and lodge history. In his book Skunny Wundy, Dr. Arthur Parker, who assisted in selecting the name of Ty-Ohni Lodge, tells the tale of “The Ghost of the Great White Stag.” Near Camp Babcock-Hovey, the home of Ganeodiyo Lodge, live a unique herd of true white deer on land that was once part of the Sampson military base. The original Ganeodiyo Lodge neckerchiefs were made from parachute cloth from Sampson.

Since its formation, Tschipey Achtu lodge has actively supported the council and local community through many activities. Our annual “Adopt-a-Park” day of service provides much needed trail maintenance and other assistance at local parks, and we support the council by staffing an event at Camp J. Warren Cutler, providing new Cub Scouts and their families a glimpse of a day in the life of Cub Scout Adventure Camp.

The lodge is proud to have had three youth members serve as national officers- Forrest Gertin as 2017 National Chief, Kyle Piper as Northeast Region Chief in 2014, and Ryan “Ziek” McFarland in the same position in 1994.

Tschipey Achtu Lodge looks forward to many more years of service.